» NYC Muni-Meter

June 30, 2015

NYC Muni MeterAs of July 1, 2015, you’ll be able to pre-pay your NYC Muni Meter up to one hour before the meter regulations go into effect.

Why? This change, sponsored by NYC Councilman David G. Greenfield, specifically benefits NYC drivers who need NYC street parking before the Muni Meter becomes active, but won’t be able to feed the meter when it does become active. For example, you have an 8:30am doctor appointment and you need to arrive at 8:15am, but the Muni Meter doesn’t become active until 8:30am. Currently, you’d have to run out just as your appointment is starting. Under this new legislation, you can pre-pay the NYC Muni Meter at 8:15am — to begin the parking period at 8:30am. Greenfield sponsored this bill to help NYC drivers avoid that dreaded NYC parking ticket.

Sounds simple, right? But because of the complexities involved, Greenfield’s law gave the City two years from July 1, 2013 to change the muni-meter machines to accept pre-payment. The city has already re-programmed many muni-meters including ones in Greenfield’s Boro Park neighborhood. All of the city’s muni-meters will be reprogrammed by this July 1st.

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July 14, 2013

NYC Parking TicketIt seems the best way to avoid paying a NYC parking ticket is to have your vehicle registered with a large business. According to NYC Controller John Liu, there are 316 companies with unpaid NYC parking ticket fines that exceed nine months. Total bill? $1.3 million.

The New York Daily News article that broke this story gives examples of small companies with outstanding fines exceeding $150,000, and these NYC parking violations go back to 2004!

The Daily News reports that Liu’s NYC auditor analyzed a NYC Finance Department program that enrolls businesses with many vehicles into a program where the vehicles won’t get towed for a NYC parking violation. In exchange, these companies are supposed to Read more…

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May 12, 2013

NYC muni-meter-imageCity Council speaker and a Democratic candidate for NYC mayor, Christine Quinn, announced plans last week to propose changes to NYC parking’s Muni-Meter system. Typically, one Muni-Meter is located for each NYC block and drivers must pay for time at the meter and place a printed receipt on their car’s dashboard.

Flaws with Muni-Meters

  • Sometimes they just don’t work
  • They can run out of ink or paper
  • If you have a broken NYC Muni-Meter, you must find another meter (sometimes on another block)
  • Muni-Meters will still take your money when NYC parking regulations aren’t in effect, ie. Sunday

Good things about Muni-Meters

  • Research shows that you can fit more cars on the street when parking spaces are not marked, because drivers will park closer to vehicles already parked.

Quinn’s Proposal includes: Read more…

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November 4, 2012

We all know that motorcycles take up way less room than even a small car, and they can usually fit into a really small NYC parking space where there are no NYC parking meters. If they do park on street with meters, then they pay the normal NYC Muni-Meter rates that a car pays. NYC Councilman Peter F. Vallone, Jr. proposed a bill to make motorcycle parking in NYC. Why?

Because motorcyclists say:

  • enforcement is inconsistent, and
  • there is no suitable place on their vehicles to display the receipts. Some riders said receipts were often stolen, blown away, or damaged by rain.

The NYC Department of Transportation recommends that motocyclists purchase clear plastic cases to hold their meter receipts. Most motorcyclists claim they are getting NYC parking tickets because either the receipt doesn’t stay attached to the motorcycle or there aren’t clear instructions on where to put the Muni-Meter receipt.

Read more in The New York Times article.

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September 25, 2012

NYC muni-meter-imageIt’s been a few years since the NYC City Council implemented a law that NYC parking meter regulations are not active on Sundays. But some locals and many tourists don’t know this law and continue to pay for NYC parking at a Muni Meter on Sundays. They’re not getting a NYC parking ticket, but they are wasting their money.

Soon, all NYC parking Muni Meters will be shut down on Sundays and will not accept any payments. We don’t know what will happen with individual parking meters, but these parking meters are being removed and replaced with NYC Muni Meters. The Muni Meter covers an entire block, so you need to park, make your payment at the Muni Meter, and then place the receipt on your car’s dashboard.

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May 23, 2012

NYC muni-meter-imageAs of Tuesday, May 15, 2012, new rules for NYC Muni-Meters.

If you pay for a NYC Muni Meter ticket, you can use that time at any other Muni Meter location as long as the new location has the same meter rate.

Until now, some people have been getting NYC parking tickets for using the same Muni Meter ticket at two locations.

 

Filed under: NYC Street Parking — Tags: , — mtohn @ 3:27 pm
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February 1, 2012

NYC muni-meter for street parkingLast year, we told you that you could use a NYC Muni-Meter receipt at more than one NYC street parking spot. So if you purchased 3 hours and only used 2 hours, you could still use that receipt for the third hour if you needed to park somewhere else — that also had a NYC Muni-Meter.

Sadly, that convenience may be changing. The NYC Department of Transportation (DOT) is considering changing the rules so that you can use what’s left on the Muni-Meter receipt ONLY at a meter that charges the same rates. Read more…

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August 24, 2011

NYC Parking MeterYou finally find a great NYC parking spot, do a stunningly perfect parallel parking job, and then realize you don’ t have quarters for the parking meter or a NYC Muni-Card for the Muni-Meters. Don’t panic, because soon you may be able to pay with your cell phone!

According to the New York Post, NYC is going to pilot test paying for your NYC parking meters with your cell phone. When you have a little bit of time left on the meter, you’ll get notice on your phone and you’ll be able to buy more minutes.

This seems like a great idea to us, but we’re not sure how it will work with NYC’s law that you cannot add time or minutes to a meter once you’ve parked for the maximum time. So if you park in a 2 hour spot for 2 hours, you can’t just add more time and stay parked there.

The test will happen in almost 300 spaces for one year. Chances are, the test areas will probable be in the outer boroughs on a busy commercial strip with retail and restaurants.

We’re also wondering what NYC will do with all the new parking meters it just bought.

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November 17, 2009

Don’t you hate when you run back to your meter and find a ticket issued just 2 minutes after the meter expired?
NYC muni-meter-image
Last week, the NY City Council approved legislation (which was introduced way back in March 2009) that gives you an extra five minutes ‘grace period’ before Muni-Meter parking regulations and Alternate Side of the Street parking rules are enforced. Mayor Bloomberg says that this will lead to ‘chaos’ and says he will veto this measure, but the Council can over-ride his veto with a two-thirds majority.

The City Council, which passed the law at an overwhelming 47-2 majority, made its decision on the premise that everyone’s watch cannot possibly be set to the exact same time. So if you believe your meter runs out at 2:17pm and your watch is a few minutes slow, then you don’t really deserve a ticket if you get to your car when your watch says 2:17.
Read more…

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